Bella Hadid’s Cannes Gown Had Another Epic Leg Slit BY AVERY MATERA

"Ismael's Ghosts (Les Fantomes d'Ismael)" & Opening Gala Red Carpet Arrivals - The 70th Annual Cannes Film Festival

PHOTO: GETTY IMAGES

Bella Hadid just made her first official red carpet appearance at the 2017 Cannes Film Festival, where she looked predictably gorgeous in a light pink silk Alexandre Vauthier gown with a pretty epic leg slit, which is kind of becoming her thing.

"Ismael's Ghosts (Les Fantomes d'Ismael)" & Opening Gala Red Carpet Arrivals - The 70th Annual Cannes Film Festival

PHOTO: VENTURELLI

You’ll recall the supermodel wore a similar gown on the red carpet at last year’s Cannes Film Festival in deep crimson, which also had a plunging neckline and wardrobe-malfunction-defying slit.

Speaking of wardrobe malfunctions, Bella probably could have used a little extra fabric when the wind blew her way while posing on the carpet, but she handled it like a pro—and looked incredible.

While on the red carpet, Hadid also managed to greet actress Susan Sarandon and eat ice cream, which qualifies as a pretty epic day as far we’re concerned.

FRANCE-CANNES-FILM-FESTIVAL

PHOTO: ALBERTO PIZZOLI

14 Swimsuit-Shopping Secrets Plus-Size Bloggers Swear By

PHOTO: CHRISTINA EMILIE

When plus-size clothing brand Catherines offered to whisk me away to Playa Del Carmen for a week in January, my first thought was, ‘A swimsuit? Post-holiday season? No way,’ because, you know, I’m a human woman and have (sadly) been conditioned to feel insecure in any beach situation. My second thought, though, was that waking up under a palm tree with a melted margarita doesn’t sound bad. And my third was that I’d be in the company of Kelly Augustine, Kellie Brown, Rochelle Johnson, and Madeline Jones, four plus-size bloggers who were also invited. Between that and the margarita, my mind was made up and my plane ticket was booked for the Catherines trip. When we got to the beach, talk turned (naturally) to swimsuits—how we shop them, style them, and feel good in them—so I wrote down the women’s most valuable advice. Here’s what you need to know.

1. Fit comes first. “I’d compromise color for fit in a second!” says Jones. “For me, fit is always about the boobs—I need lift and support. If you buy something that’s really pretty but it doesn’t fit properly, it’s not worth it.”

2. Consider how a suit will function. “For my body type, I like two-pieces with a high-waist because most of my weight is in my middle,” says Brown. “I don’t want a suit rolling down, want a suit to perform—when I’m moving around in the pool, I want it to stay in place.”

3. Skip bra sizing if you have big breasts. “I have a K-cup chest, so I shop suits with L or XL sizing, because a lot of bikini tops don’t come in my bra size,” says Augustine.

4. Longline tops are your friend! “I like a thicker back band, not just a typical bra band, because I also have weight back there and I need full coverage,” says Brown.

5. Try on suits at home. “Shopping in general can be frustrating—especially when it comes to swimsuits—so I do all of my buying online,” says Augustine. “That way, everything comes to me and I can try everything on in the comfort of my house.”

6. But take note of return policies. “I have better luck online,” says Brown. “If something looks cute, I’ll try it, but I look for brands that have good return policies—or stores I can make online returns in. Returning never killed anybody!”

7. And try everything you think may work.Everything,” says Johnson. “I have a cover up that’s medium/large—which I’m not, I’m more like a 3X. You never know what will work.”

8. Same goes for online shopping. “Check every tab on the sites you shop on—including regular price and sale,” says Johnson.

9. Look for options with built-in support. “Normally, I buy suits with a bra in them,” says Jones. “And pay attention to straps, if they’re too thin, they tend to dig into shoulders. By the end of the day your neck and back will hurt.”

10. Material is important too. “Something with spandex will hold you in,” says Jones. “I also love a great neckline, I usually wear a sweetheart, v-neck, or halter to give good shape.”

11. Be open to shapes beyond a bikini or standard one piece. “Get something that you’re comfortable with—for me, I want something with more coverage around the hips,” says Johnson. “I lean towards a dress or a high-waisted skirt, when I want to feel a little sexier.”

12. Sheer is in! “If you’re not up for a two-piece but you still want to feel sexy, get something that’s sheer at the top or in the mid-section,” says Augustine.

13. Remember, you can alter an imperfect suit. “I sometimes size up to a 20,” says Augustine. “If you have the option to tailor it and have a special bra size like me, why not? It’s better to invest and have a few suits that really fit you, instead of a bunch that don’t.”

14. And just do you. “No matter what you think you look like, the woman you’re looking at with the ‘perfect’ body is also insecure about something,” says Brown. “It’s not something to dwell on!” Her parting thought: “I want to go swimming more than I don’t like my arms.”

MUSIC Girlpool Talk Moving Apart, DIY, and the Privilege of Certain Spaces

 

Every once in a while a band like Girlpool comes around — and when they do, you better sit down and listen to what they have to say. Whether it’s lyrics about embracing vulnerability or the fact that the band is made up of best friends 21-year-old Harmony Tividad and 20-year-old Cleo Tucker (who always sing together), the project is just one of many outfits birthed at legendary LA punk institution, The Smell. That said, what started out as a fascinatingly unsettling, folk-leaning project has blossomed into a visceral, scuzzy indie-pop effort with their sophomore album, Powerplant. However, they haven’t lost the unnerving anxiety and rawness that made the project so beautiful to begin with. So in honor of their new record, Teen Vogue called Cleo and Harmony to talk moving apart, the privilege of occupying certain spaces, and how the DIY scene has played into it all.

Teen Vogue: Let’s go back to the beginning, why don’t you tell me how Girlpool came to be?

Harmony Tividad: Well, we met at the school. We have a bunch of mutual friends and were playing music and just kind of became really close friends. We were playing in separate bands, but our bands would play together all the time, and we started to feel like, “Why don’t we start playing music together?” So we started to try that and then eventually it just grew into what it is today.

TV: Cool. So fast-forwarding, what do you have going on currently? I know you already mentioned some more music aside from Powerplant in the works? Cleo Tucker: Yeah, well we just finished Powerplant, and we had been working on videos up until recently. That’s been fun, but we have a lot of songs that we haven’t recorded yet. Harmony and I have been navigating the sound of it and experimenting with recording. We both moved back home to LA so we’re finally in the same place again. [But other than that], we’ve been rehearsing for the Powerplant tour and working on new recordings together.

We had this short period of time with like on separate explorations for six or seven months — where Harmony and I were living in different cities that were only like two hours apart. So we saw each other a lot and were even working on Powerplant at times together — just sending memos and stuff back and forth. And then we’d meet up and play music. We were always in communication constantly, no matter where we are. But we just kind of needed to live apart to test out some different vibes individually.

*TV:*I’m just imagining band practice over Skype. But moving on, let’s talk a little bit about the themes you wanted to address with this upcoming album.

HT: For us, I feel like there are topics that we are always kind of trying to address. But I feel like it’s kind of in the music and to overtly name some would be selling the songs short almost.

CT: I feel like the record kind of captures this moment of time in Harmony and I’s lives where it was right after the Before the World Was Big Tour and we were on tour for the first time. Yeah, it was our first time touring like that ever. And living in different places. I think it’s a really good capture of where Harmony and I both individually stood at that time together.

TV: That’s true, tour is a big step! That said, I feel like you always have to deal with some kind of bullsh*t on your first tour, you know? But also just being young people, out there for the first time, is hard — always being underestimated by the world at large and whatever. Have you noticed that? And how do you guys try to combat this?

CT: To be honest, I feel like I live an extremely privileged life. I’ve definitely experienced moments where I feel underestimated by somebody before, but if feel like great in my life.

HT: I feel like it depends. Usually I don’t really spend much time around other people. Like I don’t really go out, and when I do I feel like I kind of mainly interact with people that I really feel connected to. So when I do feel [like I’m being condescended to or underestimated] I try to avoid that person. It’s silly, but I don’t know. I just feel like I try to avoid anything that could bring that feeling to me, because it feels really bad. And I hate that anyone has to experience that.

TV: Yeah, that’s fair. Like why put yourself through that? Is that something you consciously resolved to do this year — to sort of take care of yourself by putting yourself and your feelings first?

CT: That is definitely a new development in my life, yes. Like, I don’t feel like it’s [was a set decision that] “No, I’m not gonna be underestimated anymore.” I feel like Harmony and I have actually just always had the mentality of taking care of things thoroughly for ourselves when we need to. And if it feels bad, do not do it, you know?

We don’t surround ourselves with it. I think that that’s really important to recognize. That you have the ability and the control to own your own autonomy and remove yourself from toxicity and unhealthy environments. And [the ability to do so is such] an important part of being a human.

HT: Or to even just emotionally remove yourself from toxic situations too.

TV: Totally, but at the same time that’s definitely a privilege that a lot of people may not have?

CT: Definitely. And that’s kind of why I also feel strange speaking on whether others feel underestimated, because I think that we have the privilege to surround ourselves in places that feel good.

TV: Right. And it’s like you guys came up through the DIY scene, which is such a supportive place, but how has that really affected the band’s trajectory?

HT: I feel like getting into DIY was a really powerful moment for me personally because the community spaces that I found really were welcoming and open. And gave me the feeling that my economy was whole and extended to the world around me. And I could make work and bring people together who’s work inspired me. And that was really, made me feel, very free and liberated. When I was a teenager who felt pretty limited by school and higher education and trying to get into college and stuff, finding DIY opened my eyes to the fact that there’s other outlets in the world where people interact and do things. There’s not just this simple system exists, but there’s other systems that exist or are existing.

CT: No, I totally agree. DIY was the first time in my life where I felt really safe to share vulnerable parts of me to people that I had admiration for and loved their work to. And felt like there was this oasis of artistic excitement in high school that was beautiful.

TV: Do you remember the first time you really felt at home, or like amongst you peers?

CT: Oh God. We would go [to The Smell in LA] like literally every weekend. We would be there playing in band and going to shows. Honestly, when I was a kid and going there a lot, and all of our friends would be there and we’d all be singing songs that we all loved together. Yeah. That was like a giant feeling of magic.

TV: What sort of advice would you give to young people trying to break into the music scene? Or even just get their voices out there.

HT: I think the main thing is just to stay true to you and let that empower you, and be around people that empower you and listen and [know] what is important.

CT: Yeah. I agree. And I feel like that would be wonderful if we could prep that statement for young women spelled with a Y instead of an E. Like, [that terminology is] is inclusive of people who are female-bodied.

HT: [Or like people who], no matter what you were assessed at birth, you identify with being a woman, [we want to include them].

MAKE ‘UP’: Taylor Hill Rocks Bold Hair and Makeup Inspiration in Teen Vogue’s Volume 1 Issue

While Taylor Hill will never walk into a room unnoticed, dressed in her red pullover and jeans—and before hair and makeup—there is something totally every girl about her the morning of her Teen Vogue shoot. “People don’t realize my age,” says the 20-year-old Victoria’s Secret Angel and newest face of Lancôme. “I’m really just a nerd.” In the six years since being discovered at a horse ranch, the Denver native has been modeling and meeting people around the globe, learning a thing or two about love along the way. Rule number one: If someone doesn’t get your goals, move on. When Taylor was a teenager, “boys didn’t understand what I was doing. I couldn’t connect with anybody,” she says. “I felt so much more mature than they were—it was like talking to my younger brother!” Today, Taylor is in a two-year relationship with Michael Stephen Shank, a former model who understands the demands of her career. “He’s never sad when I’m leaving [for a job], and he never guilt-trips me to come home,” she says. “I would never sacrifice things in my life for somebody who wouldn’t do the same for me.” If you can find someone who gets you, that’s great, but in the meantime, she says, “don’t take dating too seriously.” Prioritize your friends—even after you’re blissfully coupled. “Hang out with your girls! I hate the idea of a life revolving around boys.

*For a porcelain complexion — plus sun protection — reach for a compact cushion packed with SPF like Lancôme Teinte Idole Ultra Cushion Foundation. Valentino dress, $6,700. Valentino Boutiques. Mercedes Salazar earrings, $173. shopbop.com. *

Give bare lips a boost with Lancôme L’Absolu Rouge Hydraing Shaping Lipstick in Coquette — the creamy formula slips on lips effortlessly.Preen by Thornton Bregazzi dress and slip, $2,205. net-a-porter.com. Ashley Williams earrings, $170. Nordstrom.

Photographed by Daniel Sannwald

Even bold, beautiful brows like Taylor’s can reap the benefits of a lifting brow tint. Try Lancôme Sourcils Styler Brow Gel to take yours to new heights.

Photographed by Daniel Sannwald

*Two steps to doll-like eyes: Lancôme Drama Liqui-Pencil Longwear Kohl Eyeliner and Côte D’Azur and Grandiôse Extreme Mascara. Dior dress, $14,500. Dior Boutiques. Eres bra, $160. net-a-porter.com. Falke tights, $48. falke.com. Miu Miu shoes, $1,190. miumiu.com. *

Photographed by Daniel Sannwald

Score plush, peachy cheeks like Taylor with a swipe of Lancôme’s Belle De Teint blush. Simone Rocha dress, $3,920. Simone Rocha NY.

Dior dress, $14,500. Dior Boutiques. Eres bra, $160. net-a-porter.com. A.L.C top, $195. alcltd.com. Isabel Marant pants. Isabel Marant NY. Robert Lee Morris Collection earrings, $145. robertleemorris.com. Eve’s Addiction necklace, $62. evesaddiction.com.

Set Design by Josephine Shokrian Studio.

Don’t forget to subscribe now to get our new (and bigger-than-ever!) Young Love issue.

Related: Bella Hadid Opens Up About Her Biggest Breakup on Our New Cover

, and he never guilt-trips me to come home,” she says. “I would never sacrifice things in my life for somebody who wouldn’t do the same for me.” If you can find someone who gets you, that’s great, but in the meantime, she says, “don’t take dating too seriously.” Prioritize your friends—even after you’re blissfully coupled. “Hang out with your girls! I hate the idea of a life revolving around boys.

*For a porcelain complexion — plus sun protection — reach for a compact cushion packed with SPF like Lancôme Teinte Idole Ultra Cushion Foundation. Valentino dress, $6,700. Valentino Boutiques. Mercedes Salazar earrings, $173. shopbop.com. *

Give bare lips a boost with Lancôme L’Absolu Rouge Hydraing Shaping Lipstick in Coquette — the creamy formula slips on lips effortlessly.Preen by Thornton Bregazzi dress and slip, $2,205. net-a-porter.com. Ashley Williams earrings, $170. Nordstrom.

Photographed by Daniel Sannwald

Even bold, beautiful brows like Taylor’s can reap the benefits of a lifting brow tint. Try Lancôme Sourcils Styler Brow Gel to take yours to new heights.

Photographed by Daniel Sannwald

*Two steps to doll-like eyes: Lancôme Drama Liqui-Pencil Longwear Kohl Eyeliner and Côte D’Azur and Grandiôse Extreme Mascara. Dior dress, $14,500. Dior Boutiques. Eres bra, $160. net-a-porter.com. Falke tights, $48. falke.com. Miu Miu shoes, $1,190. miumiu.com. *

Photographed by Daniel Sannwald

Score plush, peachy cheeks like Taylor with a swipe of Lancôme’s Belle De Teint blush. Simone Rocha dress, $3,920. Simone Rocha NY.

Dior dress, $14,500. Dior Boutiques. Eres bra, $160. net-a-porter.com. A.L.C top, $195. alcltd.com. Isabel Marant pants. Isabel Marant NY. Robert Lee Morris Collection earrings, $145. robertleemorris.com. Eve’s Addiction necklace, $62. evesaddiction.com.

Set Design by Josephine Shokrian Studio.

Don’t forget to subscribe now to get our new (and bigger-than-ever!) Young Love issue.

Related: Bella Hadid Opens Up About Her Biggest Breakup on Our New Cover

90s Rocket Dog Sandals Are Making a Comeback This Summer

It’s no secret that ’90s nostalgia has reached a fever pitch. Whether it’s iconic fashion trends from the Gap, the return of the Tamagotchi, or Friends being made into a musical, it’s pretty clear that the ’90s is a decade that won’t die (and for good reason!). Enter the latest craze: platform Rocket Dog sandals, the go-to wedge of every high school girl in 1997.

The resurgence began when one of the fashion industry’s most iconic stylists, Elizabeth Saltzman, teamed up with the brand to give the classic shoe a modern edge, and the result is perfection. The best part, though? The shoes are only $85, they’re great for all your summer looks from hanging out to going out, and they’re available online at matches.com.

Below, Elizabeth talks to Teen Vogue about her incredible career as a celebrity stylist, her advice on getting into the industry, and, of course, how to style these amazing new shoes.

Teen Vogue: How did you get your start in fashion?

Elizabeth Saltzman:

It was so long ago! The truth of the matter is that I wasn’t equipped to do what I needed to do to follow what I thought was my dream: architecture. I quickly found out that you had to do math, and I wasn’t great at it. However, I was so fortunate to have incredibly supportive parents who, while they were very disappointed when I didn’t go to college, still supported my dream. My mom was in fashion; my dad was an interior designer. But I just really wanted to do it on my own. At the time, the only job I could get was in retail, so I started at the bottom of the heap, and I worked and worked and socialized my way in as far as I could. I started at this really cool store in New York City folding clothes. Eventually, I got offered a job at Armani at their first store. I worked hard to prove [myself] and was offered a job in Milan on the design team. A few years later, I was offered a job at Vogue as an assistant, and I was blown away. Though I use the word “luck” a lot, I worked to get there. I was never late; I never acted tired. To get somewhere you have to work and you have to be hungry. You have to understand that the fashion industry is amazing, but it’s work, a lot of work. You have to ask questions and listen to the answers.

TV: Do you think it’s important to have a college degree as a stylist?

ES: Well, it can only help. I didn’t know fabrics. I didn’t know styles. I had to go to the library to get knowledge. Going to school will never hurt, full stop. If you can, though, intern. You can start young. We have two interns in our office — one is 16 [years old], and one is 20. The 16-year-old is a girl who wrote a hundred letters to different agents telling them that she was in high school but she wanted to intern and that she loved fashion. I wrote back and told her that I wanted to help her but I lived in London. Turns out, she lives in London, and now she works with me one day a week after school. I can’t wait for her to finish school so she can work with us! For anyone interested in fashion, go to school, work in clothing stores, understand as much as you can about the industry, and then just work as hard as you can.

TV: As a stylist, what advice do you have for finding your personal style?

ES: I think you have to be willing to change and not get stuck. Buy the obvious things you need — a good pair of jeans, a good tee, a good jacket — and the rest is fun. The thing about personal style is that you don’t want to waste a ton of money or time. Keep it simple at first. Fashion isn’t what is important when you’re young; it’s feeling good and making sure that you’re representing you. It’s important to feel good and confident. Don’t hide your insecurities — just embrace what you love about yourself. Look for style icons and figure out what you like about them.

TV: What inspired you to work with Rocket Dog to bring back the platform sandal?

ES: Well, it came from a very innocent place. Many years ago, when I was working at Vanity Fair, we would host the Oscar party after the awards. All the women that I worked with would be dressed at 3 p.m. and be standing on their feet until 2 a.m. and no one could move by the end of it! Their feet were swollen, and they hurt so bad that I started ordering high wedge flip-flops for under their dresses. Then once they had their pictures taken, they could slip these on. They would be so happy because it was like they were walking on marshmallows. I would watch the celebrities take their shoes off and walk barefoot so I would offer them the shoes. Then when I became a stylist, I started customizing them for my celebrity clients. Eventually, we just called Rocket Dog so that we could make some that would be a great fit for everyone. At the end of the day, we just wanted happy feet. I couldn’t work without the incredible shoe designers of the world, and there is most certainly a place for those styles. These are for when you want to be playful and comfortable!

Related: 10 Best ’90s Trends That Are Still Popular Today

PHOTOS: BBNaija Finalist Debbie Rise Covers May Edition Of VL! Africa

One of the finalist at the just concluded BBNaija See Gobe, Oluwarise Deborah Ebun popularly known as Debbie Rise, is the cover of the May edition of VL! Africa.

The guitarist, took time to speak exclusively to VL about her experience in the house, current projects, future plans and her relationship with fellow housemates especially Bassey.

On exposing her body, the Gagabu singer explained saying; I cannot expose my body for any amount of money because I have what it takes to make such amount of money. No need, its about who I am.

See photos below;

Amandla Stenberg’s New Movie Is Bringing Diversity to the White-Washed World of Teen Romance

If you’ve seen the trailer for Everything, Everything, it’s probably pretty clear that it’s 2017’s ultimate teen romance—poised to make you cry, sigh, and thirst for a relationship as loving as Maddy and Olly’s. But the film is also a much-needed injection of diversity in a genre that’s typically occupied by white cis-gender actors. Not only is the film about an interracial teen couple, it’s written by a woman of color, directed by a woman of color, and stars a woman of color, who—by the way—is gender non-binary. It’s an example of the kick-ass results Hollywood gets at its most exclusive. It’s a movie teens (and adults) should be watching, and we spoke to the actress at its helm: Amandla Stenberg.

On working with women directors:

“I’ve been lucky enough to work with three female directors in a row. It’s been a coincidence, but something I always keep in mind. This project was really special because not only was the director a black woman, it was written by a black woman, featuring a main character who is biracial, who is in an interracial relationship. There are so many different layers—it’s just a more accurate reflection of our world today, because the way we experience life and our relationships with each other is so nuanced.”

On the visibility of interracial relationships:

“It was on of the reasons I took the role. It is extremely important to me, and I recognize I have the opportunity to create visibility by being in movies that are willing to be fresher and more daring in their casting choices.”

On working on a project with women of color at the helm:

“Working with a community of black women on this project was really special. There are certain things that are kind of unspoken between women of color when they’re in a professional setting together. Especially if that setting is more corporate. We knew we were making strides towards creating something like this in a system that isn’t always necessarily for it.

May 19th y’all…go see ur carefree black girl infiltrate mainstream media 🎟

A post shared by amandla (@amandlastenberg) on May 2, 2017 at 5:39pm PDT

On being weary of her platform:

“I worry about it in a certain sense. I hope people online understand that the celebrity culture we’ve created is not really real. So when they’re speaking to and about me, I’m a person, so I’m going to make mistakes. It’s inevitable because I’m human. I’m not necessarily weary of the platform, more hoping and encouraging people to understand that I’m just a teenager doing my best with what I have. But for the most part, I’m really excited. But we do place certain people on pedestals, and it’s pretty nonsensical.”

On navigating call-out culture:

“Right now, we’re ready to question things, to recognize them, to call out when things are not cool. We need to move forward and utilize that tool in a way that is pointed well, and to not just try to tear down everyone. We need to use that skill to tear down people who are actually bad.”

On whether all those “Get in Formation” signs held by white women during the Women’s March were appropriative:

“I don’t know if I can speak on the appropriation of one particular artist’s work, I feel like that’s kind of up to Beyoncé—not necessarily up to anyone else. But I do think it’s important to think about diversity and think about privilege while we’re protesting our currently political climate—especially for things like the Women’s March. For that to be a conversation we talk about. Supporting all communities in protest.”

Shay Mitchell Wore a Very, Very Sheer Dress at the MTV Movie & TV Awards

Shay Mitchell walked the red carpet at tonight’s MTV Movie Awards wearing a shiny, glitzy zebra print gown which featured some very dangerous cut-outs:

For a segment she hosted with Blackish star Yara Shahidi during the broadcast, Shay changed into a ~very sheer~ black naked dress with embroidery, lace-up detailing and some long fringe stuff happening — the sort of thing that you know would trip up most people, but not Shay!

Oh, and Shay also wore nipple pasties, because this dress meant they were necessary.

Follow @Seventeen on Instagram!

From: Cosmopolitan

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